Myths about Plastisol Ink Pt. 1

January 06, 2020

Myths about Plastisol Ink Pt. 1

My plastisol ink is ready to use right out of the container!

ERRRRR!!!! False. Inks are never ready to use. Never never never. Plastisol inks should be stirred for several reasons, one of them being that they begin to thicken when they have been sitting for a while. This is called “false body” and you can notice that when you try to scoop some ink out of the container it is very heavy and thick. Stirring this will help the ink come back to a fluid thinner body. Also, when an ink sits for a while you can see the oils starting to separate. It is important that you mix that together to get your ink back to a nice creamy texture again.

I will just use this one white ink for cotton, 50/50 and tri-blends!

Now some people will say all sorts of things here. Some are going to be with it or against it. Some will use 1 ink for everything and claim it works and other swill use several different inks for each different type of application. Sure, there are low bleed inks that are used on everything from your 100% cotton to pure poly inks. What people don’t seem to understand us that some poly inks have dye blockers to help keep your garments from having dye migration issues. These blockers can sometimes have a bad affect with the dyes on 100% cotton shirts resulting in “ghost” images. So no not all inks are created equal.

Using an ink reducer will reduce the ink opacity.

Well like it or not you can reduce a high opacity ink without reducing the opacity. You can increase the opacity of some inks… SOME NOT ALL! At some point in time the viscosity of your ink may get to the point where stirring prior to use will not make it any easier to print. Now when it comes to printing on black shirts, more detail is normally needed requiring a higher or finer mesh count as well as higher opacity. you will find yourself from time to time utilizing finer mesh counts that could pose a challenge to high-opacity inks completely clearing the screen and stencil. If this is the case, a small amount of curable or balanced reducer (2-5 percent by weight) can be added to the ink to lower its viscosity to a printable level. Depending upon the type of ink and its initial viscosity, a 2-5 percent addition of curable reducer can reduce the viscosity by as much as 20-25 percent, making it easier to print and more prone to clear the mesh. If all the ink clears the mesh and sits up on top of the garment due to this modification, it will actually look opaquer. Be careful to accurately measure the reducer because, in this case, you can quickly get too much of a good thing and cause the ink to penetrate the garment.

I have been printing for years I know how to print; I don’t need any instructions.

Believe it or not that’s not the case you should always read the instructions of the tech data sheet because you are going to notice a difference in everyone’s products. It may not be something major, but you will notice it. Some Inks that you should read the technical data sheets for are going to be your specialty inks. Puff, Glitters, Low temp cure plastisol inks are going to be some of the inks that you should really pay attention too.

I always print a base on dark shirts with high opaque inks on top so the design comes out nice and bright!

So like many thing that people read or hear and go overboard, you do not need to use highly opaque inks over a base. First highly opaque inks are meant to be used on their own without a base, hence the name. Second highly opaque inks normally cost more so why would you pay  more for an ink that’s supposed to be used on its own on top of a base, it’s a total overkill. If you are using a base you don’t need to use anything fancy, a normal plastisol ink will give you the nice bright color you want on a base.

 

Tune in to catch part 2 later this month, we would have loved to just keep this one going but we know we would loose some of you after so long. If you guys have any questions on anything you have just read just reach out to us. Drop a comment below, dm us on instagram, live chat is always on our website as well, just which ever is easiest for you.




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